Post Your Pyrocat HD Development Times

Ian-Barber

Admin
Staff member
Registered User
I am in the process of updating the Pyrocat website and want to add some film/development times from users.

If you could submit your own preferred times, that would be appreciated.

If you could submit in this format, it would help me to populate website more easily.

Film:
ISO:
Dev Time:
Dev Temp:
Agitation Type: Rotary/Tray/Inversion
Comments:

Ian
 

Alan9940

Active Member
Registered User
Dilution and film size should also be included...

Acros 100 (120)
EI 80
Pyrocat-HD 1:1:100
15 mins @ 21C
Small tank, continuous agitation for the first minute, followed by 10 secs agitation at the 3/4, 1/2, and 1/4 marks (10 1/2 min, 7, and 3 1/2 mins, respectively)
Provides enhanced edge detail

Acros 100 (5x4)
EI 80 (EI 50 is useful here, too)
Pyrocat-HD 1:1:100
10 mins @ 21C
Jobo 3006 drum rotating at slowest speed (CPP-2)

Fomapan 100 (5x4)
EI 80
Pyrocat-HD 1:1:100
9 1/4 mins @ 20C
B&W King stainless steel tank (very similar to 5x4 Nikkor tank)
Initial agitation of 4 inversions, followed by 2 inversions each minute thereafter
6 1/2 mins at 24C is a higher temp alternative

Fomapan 100 (5x4)
EI 80
Pyrocat-HD 3A + 2B + 600ml water @21C
Homemade tanks (ala Steve Sherman)
5 mins pre-soak, 2 mins initial agitation, followed by 5 x 3(15); 15 secs agitation each 5 mins for 3 cycles (17 mins total)
EMA (extreme minimal agitation) technique

Fomapan 100 (10x8)
EI 80
Pyrocat-HD 1:1:100
15 mins @ 21C
Tanks & hangers
Continuous agitation for the first minute, followed by 2 agitation cycles at the 3/4, 1/2, and 1/4 marks (10 1/2, 7, and 3 1/2 mins)
No pre-soak

Fomapan 100 (10x8)
Pyrocat-HD 8A + 5B + 1,295ml water (1,295ml total volume) @21C
Homemade tanks (ala Steve Sherman)
5 mins pre-soak, 2 mins initial agitation, followed by 5 x 3(15); 15 secs agitation each 5 mins for 3 cycles (17 mins total)
EMA (extreme minimal agitation) technique


I've included the specific Pyrocat formula because there are several available.

Let me know if any of the above is unclear and I'll do my best to help.
 

Ian Grant

Well-Known Member
Registered User
For tank development I use Pyrocat HD at 1+1 to 100 at 20º here in the UK, 27ºC in late Spring to Autumn when in Turkey.

All films except Fomapan 100 & 200 get shot at or just under box speed nad processed for 15 to 17 minutes at 20ºC inversion agitation, continuous for the firt 30 seconds, the a couple of inversions every minute. I use the same times for EFKE PL25 at its Daylight 50EI, and in the past Tmax 100 & 200 at half box speed, and the odd Acros at box speed.

Fomapan 100 & 200 are always shot at half box speed and processed for 12 to 13 minutes at 20ºC same agitation as above.

I find all my negatives print around the same times and contrast grade, I may shoot Delta 100 and 400 (120) and HP5, in the same sessions (or trips) and will develop them together in the same tanks. I ofte stick 120 Paterson reels in my Jobo 2000 tanks above the 5x4 spiral. I get very consistent negatives.

10x8 EFKE Pl25 at 50 EI and Fortepan 200 at 100 EI get dish processed with Pyrocat HD 2+2 to 100 for 9 mins at 20ºC as I don't like spending too long in the dark. Now though I have a Paterson Orbital so will go to 1+1 to 100 dilution next time I shoot the format.

Ian
 

DaveF

New Member
Registered User
Thanks for this: interesting. I use Pyrocat HD for processing all my FP4+ on 10x8, to produce dual-purpose negatives for scanning and alt-pro. I also shoot B&W on 6x6 and 6x7 but use Delta 400 and DDX for that. I formally used Delta 100 and Ilfosol 3 or DDX for 5x4 but haven't shot any 5x4 B&W for a couple of years I think.
I use FP4+ at 125, use 2:2:100 with times usually now of 10'30" @ 21ºC for N with normal agitation - I have experimented with going a lot longer than this for alt-pro (esp. Argyrotypes) though with mixed results depending on a given negative (judging what times will work for processing given sheets for alt pro is a bit of an art I'm still trying to work my way through: so many variables with argyrotype especially). These times are perfect for scanning of course.

I use the new Steaman SP810 daylight trays for 10x8, which are excellent and a great improvement for my needs over the BTZS tubes which I still have and used until this year. (They need less space, and you don't need to go back into a changing tent to swap caps: I do all my processing in our small downstairs bathroom).
I then use Adox Acetic Acid (6mls to make up 500ml solution), I fix with TF4, and use Sodium sulphite hypoclear (1 heaped teaspoon for 500ml solution) replacing a given mix after 8 sheets.

There are only two things you have to watch with the Steaman trays: first, that you hold the lid firmly in place during processing because the lid just sits in place, not clip-on; second, the drain-time - on my current estimates it takes 18 seconds to completely drain 500ml of chemistry from the tray. Not really an issue for B&W but might be for the unwary intending to use these trays for colour processing where times are shorter and more critical (colour processing is very possible: I've not done it yet but will be experimenting quite soon hopefully).

[post updated to accurately reflect what my current notes tell me, even if for some I have been over-developing slightly]
 
Last edited:

DaveF

New Member
Registered User
An update that I've now run a specific Argyrotype film & print test for this setup with 2 6x7 contact sheets (basically following John Blakemore's test process for Silver Gelatin) and my dev time is a too long by prob +2 stops and my FP4+ exposure is also perhaps predictably under by 1 stop (for this process). But for scanning this works fine
 

KenS

Well-Known Member
Registered User
I am in the process of updating the Pyrocat website and want to add some film/development times from users.

If you could submit your own preferred times, that would be appreciated.

If you could submit in this format, it would help me to populate website more easily.

Film:
ISO:
Dev Time:
Dev Temp:
Agitation Type: Rotary/Tray/Inversion
Comments:

Ian
Ian,
Might I suggest you 'seek and find' Dr Sandy King's web site wherein he has posted a LOT of information on Pyrocat HD
including 'curves/graphs on development and 'timing'

Ken
 

Camerashy

Member
Registered User
For tank development I use Pyrocat HD at 1+1 to 100 at 20º here in the UK, 27ºC in late Spring to Autumn when in Turkey.

All films except Fomapan 100 & 200 get shot at or just under box speed nad processed for 15 to 17 minutes at 20ºC inversion agitation, continuous for the firt 30 seconds, the a couple of inversions every minute. I use the same times for EFKE PL25 at its Daylight 50EI, and in the past Tmax 100 & 200 at half box speed, and the odd Acros at box speed.

Fomapan 100 & 200 are always shot at half box speed and processed for 12 to 13 minutes at 20ºC same agitation as above.

I find all my negatives print around the same times and contrast grade, I may shoot Delta 100 and 400 (120) and HP5, in the same sessions (or trips) and will develop them together in the same tanks. I ofte stick 120 Paterson reels in my Jobo 2000 tanks above the 5x4 spiral. I get very consistent negatives.

10x8 EFKE Pl25 at 50 EI and Fortepan 200 at 100 EI get dish processed with Pyrocat HD 2+2 to 100 for 9 mins at 20ºC as I don't like spending too long in the dark. Now though I have a Paterson Orbital so will go to 1+1 to 100 dilution next time I shoot the format.

Ian
Hello Ian, what is your agitation routine using the Paterson Orbital and how much developer do you use for four 4x5 sheets of film, 300ml?
 

Ian Grant

Well-Known Member
Registered User
Yes around 300ml any less and you risk having insufficient developing agent. You can over agitate with an Orbital I rock it gently in all directions twice a minute, it's easier to do then describe.

I use my Jobo 2000 inversion tanks (I have two) more as I can process a dozen sheets at a time 2 six sheet spirals in a tank. It's less economic but as Pyrocat HD is so cheap it's never bothered me. I should use the Orbital more but it's mainly for 10x8 and 7x5 sheet film in my case.

Ian
 

mpirie

Active Member
Registered User
I sit my Orbital in a 10x12 developing tray half-filled with water at 20 ˚C to help keep the Orbital up to temp and it makes it easier to rock it left to right, then top to bottom as it floats.

As Ian says 300ml of Pyrocat is about right based on Sandy's recommendation of no less than 75ml per 5x4 sheet of film, so 4 sheets in the Orbital is my normal.

Mike
 

Alan Clark

Active Member
Registered User
I think the Paterson Orbital treats different photographers in different ways. Whenever I have tried intermittent agitation I have had very uneven development which ruined the negatives. But Ian's processor obviously lets him get away with it. Perhaps he paid more for his! My normal practice is constant but very gentle and random rocking.
As for the amount of developer in processor I think this is partly dependant on the amount of DIY work done on the dish. When I first got mine I scored shallow grooves in the bottom with the tip of a penknife, to stop the film sticking to the bottom. A simple experiment showed that 300 mls of liquid would just cover the film at the edges. After several years I started to get the odd sheet of film sticking to the bottom. So I put blobs of glue all over the bottom. This raised the sheets of film by about 2mm. and the edges of the film were now high and dry with 300mls in the tray. 500 mls barely covered the outer edges of the film, so I opted for 600mls.
Raising the level of the film now put the upper face - the emulsion side - closer to the fins so I removed them. I have been operating with this set-up for about 4 years now, with no problem.

Alan
 

Camerashy

Member
Registered User
Thank you for that Alan, I have removed the fins and put glue dots on the bottom, so I will try 600ml.
 

mpirie

Active Member
Registered User
Likewise, I used three rubber bump-stops (like the ones used on kitchen cabinet doors) to keep the film off the base of the Orbital in each 5x4 section (so 12 bump-stops in total).

I also glued some plastic tiddlywinks to the red dividers to stop the film floating too high up and moving around.

This works really well.

Mike
 

Ian Grant

Well-Known Member
Registered User
I think the Paterson Orbital treats different photographers in different ways. Whenever I have tried intermittent agitation I have had very uneven development which ruined the negatives. But Ian's processor obviously lets him get away with it. Perhaps he paid more for his! My normal practice is constant but very gentle and random rocking.
As for the amount of developer in processor I think this is partly dependant on the amount of DIY work done on the dish. When I first got mine I scored shallow grooves in the bottom with the tip of a penknife, to stop the film sticking to the bottom. A simple experiment showed that 300 mls of liquid would just cover the film at the edges. After several years I started to get the odd sheet of film sticking to the bottom. So I put blobs of glue all over the bottom. This raised the sheets of film by about 2mm. and the edges of the film were now high and dry with 300mls in the tray. 500 mls barely covered the outer edges of the film, so I opted for 600mls.
Raising the level of the film now put the upper face - the emulsion side - closer to the fins so I removed them. I have been operating with this set-up for about 4 years now, with no problem.

Alan

I think I glibly said I used 300ml in an earlier reply. that would be for a print I use 600ml for negatives that was after doing a visual inspection of coverage.

Ian
 

mpirie

Active Member
Registered User
I use 300ml for four 5x4 sheets and have had no problems with uneven development, though I do agitate constantly with a gentle rocking from side to side, then top to bottom.

300ml would only cover one or two-thirds of each sheet without agitation.

If you want total immersion, then 600ml would be better.

I have thought of trying semi-stand in the orbital with 600ml, but i'm not sure if the adjacency effects would work with the film being horizontal instead of vertical in a tank.

Mike
 

Darren Lewey

Member
Registered User
I've settled on the following:

Film: T Max 100
ISO: 80
Dev Time: 13 mins
Dev Temp: 20
Agitation Type: SP445 Tank - twice every 30 seconds

Film: Fomapan 200
ISO: 100
Dev Time: 9 mins
Dev Temp: 20
Agitation Type: SP445 Tank - 4 times on the minute
 

Barry Wilkinson

Member
Registered User
Film: FP4+
ISO: 80
Dev Time: 10.5m (N)
Dev Temp: 21C
Agitation Type: Semi-Stand, constant gentle inversions for the first minute, then four inversions after every three minutes.

Film: HP5+
ISO: 320
Dev Time: 11m (N)
Dev Temp: 21C
Agitation Type: Semi-Stand, constant gentle inversions for the first minute, then four inversions after every three minutes.
 
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