I couldn't resist ... it's becoming a habit

Marley

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Yes it's missing some parts ... which I intend to track down or fabricate ... but the bellows are 100% light tight and it's a handsome beast.
It's also half plate and smells vaguely of chip fat ...

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David M

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Chip fat should have kept the bellows nice and supple. They do seem to be in good condition.

…and if there’s Caffenol, why not Chipfatenol? Would it be the ideal developer for newspaper photographers?
 

Ian Grant

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It's a plain Ruby replaced by 1910. If those are the original bellows it's post 1900 when most manufacturers inc TP stopped using square cornered bellows. By "plain" I mean not a Special Ruby, Royal Ruby, or Folding Ruby.

Ian
 
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Marley

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It's a plain Ruby replaced by 1910. If those are the original bellows it's post 1900 when most manufacturers inc TP stopped using square cornered bellows. By "plain" I mean not a Special Ruby, Royal Ruby, or Folding Ruby.

Ian
Thanks for the info Ian. I figured it was either an Amber or a Ruby ... and those are definitely the original bellows.
I'm going to start by repairing the brass focusing tail on the left side of the camera. It's snapped at the end of the channel piece but will braze pretty easily I think. Then it's either trying to locate ... or fabricate the front standard locking knobs. The tripod 'turret' is long gone ... so no fitting of original 'sticks' unless I find a scrapper with a turret intact. Some of the back fitting hardware is missing and the focusing screen is gone ... all sortable I think.
 

Ian Grant

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The Amber has quite a different front standard. Patience and you will find the correct TP locking parts, there's a trader at the Camera Fair I go to that hasnor had some TP parts but with Covid I've not seen him since January 2020.

I think some of the TP parts were cast rather than machined, after all there were casting companies around Shude Hill in Manchester, their Jewellery Quarter, and these casters worked outside the jewellery trad as well. It was the same in Hockley - Birmingham, Hatton Garden - London, and also Sheffield.

The issue with fabricating parts is the Brass alloys uessd now are quite different to when these cameras where made. I met leading clock restorer from Cheltenham maybe 12 years ago and we had a discussion about this. He seemed to be stalking me at a Flea market but was open & honest and said he was just interested in what I was looking at and buying. BAck on topic though he uses a caster who uses the older brass allots so the parts match on his restorations. I've forgotten his full name I have his card somewhere but he'd be easy to find and I visit my niece in Cheltenham every so often.

I plan to have some Thunb wheel knobs etc cast once I get my life back in order. A friend makes tail pieces for Banjo's (£120 - £200 a piece approx) and the casting company he uses made 3D scans of an original (not made for decades) and then cleaned up imperfections etc before making the wax moulds. It will cost me maybe £200 to get the moulds but that can be quite a few different items cast at the same time. I should add I worked in the Jewellery industry for nearly 2 decades so know what precision casting can achieve.

Bottom line is I need missing parts and so do others.

Ian
 

Marley

Member
Registered User
The Amber has quite a different front standard. Patience and you will find the correct TP locking parts, there's a trader at the Camera Fair I go to that hasnor had some TP parts but with Covid I've not seen him since January 2020.

I think some of the TP parts were cast rather than machined, after all there were casting companies around Shude Hill in Manchester, their Jewellery Quarter, and these casters worked outside the jewellery trad as well. It was the same in Hockley - Birmingham, Hatton Garden - London, and also Sheffield.

The issue with fabricating parts is the Brass alloys uessd now are quite different to when these cameras where made. I met leading clock restorer from Cheltenham maybe 12 years ago and we had a discussion about this. He seemed to be stalking me at a Flea market but was open & honest and said he was just interested in what I was looking at and buying. BAck on topic though he uses a caster who uses the older brass allots so the parts match on his restorations. I've forgotten his full name I have his card somewhere but he'd be easy to find and I visit my niece in Cheltenham every so often.

I plan to have some Thunb wheel knobs etc cast once I get my life back in order. A friend makes tail pieces for Banjo's (£120 - £200 a piece approx) and the casting company he uses made 3D scans of an original (not made for decades) and then cleaned up imperfections etc before making the wax moulds. It will cost me maybe £200 to get the moulds but that can be quite a few different items cast at the same time. I should add I worked in the Jewellery industry for nearly 2 decades so know what precision casting can achieve.

Bottom line is I need missing parts and so do others.

Ian
My day Job Ian is both manufacturing new, bespoke electric guitar pickups, and restoring ones from classic instruments from the forties onwards. I rebuild and rewind pickups from Gretsch, Gibson and Fender from their Golden era ... and thus know about not being able to easily source materials! For me it's often early plastics that are the problem ... Bakelite was a popular material around WW2 and was even used for whole guitars! However, making it is a super toxic exercise and as far as I'm aware nobody does so any more. So we have to learn to live with substitutes.
Metallurgy is also a fascinating area ... I use aluminium/nickel/cobalt magnets ... but you have to know certain little known facts to get things right ... like at certain points the US government bought up all the cobalt they could get their hands on for the atom bomb project, so the magnets of that era lacked the cobalt component (yep they make the pickups sound different).
Anyway I may make some dimensionally accurate parts to get the old girl taking pictures again while I wait for the correct bits to surface.
I have to say that the mahogany on this particular camera has been finished to that beautiful 'fox fur' red that looks so striking, and with its dark brown bellows looks the epitome of handsome.
 

thronobulax

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My day Job Ian is both manufacturing new, bespoke electric guitar pickups, and restoring ones from classic instruments from the forties onwards. I rebuild and rewind pickups from Gretsch, Gibson and Fender from their Golden era ... and thus know about not being able to easily source materials! For me it's often early plastics that are the problem ... Bakelite was a popular material around WW2 and was even used for whole guitars! However, making it is a super toxic exercise and as far as I'm aware nobody does so any more. So we have to learn to live with substitutes.
Metallurgy is also a fascinating area ... I use aluminium/nickel/cobalt magnets ... but you have to know certain little known facts to get things right ... like at certain points the US government bought up all the cobalt they could get their hands on for the atom bomb project, so the magnets of that era lacked the cobalt component (yep they make the pickups sound different).
Anyway I may make some dimensionally accurate parts to get the old girl taking pictures again while I wait for the correct bits to surface.
I have to say that the mahogany on this particular camera has been finished to that beautiful 'fox fur' red that looks so striking, and with its dark brown bellows looks the epitome of handsome.
Completely OT but ... you'd likely love my early 1960s Gibson ES-335TD in butterscotch. Somewhere along the way, the covers were removed from the humbuckers, but they are original. The only other thing not from factory are the tuners. I even have the original case....

That instrument and my mid 1950s Epiphone Broadway should figure nicely in paying for grandkiddo's education thought it will pain me deeply to part with them.
 

Marley

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Registered User
Completely OT but ... you'd likely love my early 1960s Gibson ES-335TD in butterscotch. Somewhere along the way, the covers were removed from the humbuckers, but they are original. The only other thing not from factory are the tuners. I even have the original case....

That instrument and my mid 1950s Epiphone Broadway should figure nicely in paying for grandkiddo's education thought it will pain me deeply to part with them.
Of course guitars are my other love ... my career defining moment was working on the pickups of a certain 'Blackguard' telecaster belonging to ... well technically I cant say for non disclosure reasons ... but it gave me a lot of 'Satisfaction'. :)
 

Ian Grant

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Registered User
I have to say that the mahogany on this particular camera has been finished to that beautiful 'fox fur' red that looks so striking, and with its dark brown bellows looks the epitome of handsome.
That seems to natch the colour of many of my camears but somne are much lighter, and a Butcher has a red dye in its French polish, origivally it was Dargon's Blood, I matched it using a K6 pigment ink. TTH Cooke lenses used Tueric in the Shellac lacquer to give a deep colour to theirbras lenses.

Ian
 
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