X-Ray film

Discussion in 'Talk About Different Analog Films' started by DKirk, Sep 14, 2016.

  1. DKirk

    DKirk New Member

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    Just wondering how many people over here are using X-Ray film (primarily 10x8, though it can be cut down to smaller)?

    Need to see if I can get the scanner working again to post samples, but I've been primarily using some Agfa-G Plus, purchased on eBay. Aside from the drop off towards the red side of the spectrum it's been quite impressive for something that costs about 70p or less per sheet.

    I see over on the http://www.largeformatphotography.i...lability-of-Ektascan-BR-A-xray-film-in-Europe page the single coated film is now a little more easily available - have many folk here tried it?
     
  2. Alan9940

    Alan9940 Active Member

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    Hi DKirk, well...I'm over here (US) :) and I've shot quite a bit of Ektascan BR/A in my 8x10 camera. However, after many sheets I have yet to really produce the kind of negative I'm looking for; gotten pretty close...just haven't nailed it, yet. One thing I really don't like about this film is that in my experience the speed really varies based on development time. When I shorten development enough to control contrast (x-ray film is a very contrasty film, in general) film speed falls off the proverbial cliff; when I extend development to maintain film speed contrast builds up, of course. I guess it's a see-saw situation that, so far, I haven't found an acceptable combination of developer and time and/or agitation technique.

    A lot of x-ray users prefer the green latitude double-sided stuff, but I've never tried it. I keep meaning to because it's far cheaper than Ektascan and I've seen some beautiful results from it (based on that thread you referenced.) The only downsides that I've read about this film is that it scratches easily (coating on both sides) and that it doesn't incorporate any anti-haloing so highlights tend to bloom a bit. Some photographers really like that, though. If you're interested, you should give both a try. A 100-sheet box of each--Ektascan and green--will run you about the same price as a box of standard Ilford B&W 8x10 film; at least, over here anyway.

    Have fun!
     

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