Winter Light

martin henson

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Taken on Bardon Moor in West Yorkshire, I used a 90mm lens on my Ebony RSW (27mm equiv in 35mm) and used a small amount of Axis tilt to maximise foreground to infinity depth of field

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Tech Details
Ebony RSW 4x5
90mm Rodenstock Grandagon-n
Front Axis Tilt
Fuji Acros 100iso
Developed in
Kodak HC110 H Dilution 1-63
7 mins @20C
 
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KenS

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Winter ice-fog.jpg

While walking the dog around the pathway on the west side of the coulee early afternoon, I observed what is known locally as "Ice-fog". So I hurried back with the Linhof and 150mm I might have preferred my 240mm.. but it has an electronic shutter which, from past experience, does not 'work' properly at these very low temperatures. I 'noticed extremely small particles 'gently falling' (Its actually extremely small snow flakes that I photographed on the back deck
when I got home (somewhat cold handed and cold nosed) which I will soon post now that that sheet is now hanging to dry. This is the first time I have taken the time to actually record the fine particulate 'particles' as semi-macro. At -20 degrees C....and it will probably be some time before I do it again... 8-(

Ken
 

KenS

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Minus twenty is heroic. Well done.
Sir David... looking back it was really more 'stupid' than heroic... while its not the first time I exposed film "out in the cold, cold Canadian "winter weather".. It 'allowed me to to 'see' a something I never knew.... but is WAS the coldest
temperature at which I have EVER exposed film.... and I'll think twice about 'ever trying to doing it again. The hardest part was the "frosting up" on the GG from my breathing while under the dark-cloth. I think it was more 'luck than heroism.... BUT I did get to find out that of which what the 'frost cloud' was 'made-up'

Ken
 

Ian Grant

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Taken on Bardon Moor in West Yorkshire, I used a 90mm lens on my Ebony RSW (27mm equiv in 35mm) and used a small amount of Axis tilt to maximise foreground to infinity depth of field
I like the contrast of the moorland to the farmland below, nice image.

The 90mm Grandagon-N lenses have superb coatings, I've always been impressed by mine it's one of my favourite lenses - I bought mine SH from Robert White (mail order so unseen) over 30 years ago..

Ian
 

martin henson

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This my third 90 Grandagon, sold the f4.5, bought another f6.8, dropped that in a river, and managed to locate another near mint one as a replacement. I managed to fish the one in the river out, was there, underwater overnight, the front element was perfect, shutter fired fine, aperture stopped down as normal, however the rear element was knackered, managed to sell it on eBay at a reduced price.
 

Joanna Carter

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Taken on Bardon Moor in West Yorkshire, I used a 90mm lens on my Ebony RSW (27mm equiv in 35mm) and used a small amount of Axis tilt to maximise foreground to infinity depth of field
First, let me say I love the image.

Martin, when you say you used axis tilt, I assume you meant on the front standard? If so, did you tilt forwards? I have had success with this kind of "falling away" shot by tilting the front standard backwards slightly, thus putting the "hinge" above the camera and placing the front of the wedge of sharp focus in behind the nearest visible ground; then adjusting the tilt to place the rear of the wedge just above the horizon.

In this picture https://grandes-images.com/fr/Paysages/Pages/France_2007.html#0, I placed the plane of focus from the far end of the gutter on the nearest house to the second furthest street light to the left of the steps.

Mind you, it did take me around 2½ hours to work that all out :rolleyes:
 

martin henson

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Yes front tilt, the 90mm has inherent DOF stopped down, so only a small movement brought foreground and back into focus
 

Ian Grant

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Yes front tilt, the 90mm has inherent DOF stopped down, so only a small movement brought foreground and back into focus
The amount of movement needed is also depend anon the Focal length used, forgetting DOF at the focussing stage, so slight movements with a 90mm have far greater effect than the same movements with a 150mm. Of course you notice this more when working with extremes in my case a 65mm on 5x4 compared to a 12" (300mm) lens on a 10x8 camera.

Ian
 

KenS

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Minus twenty is heroic. Well done.
I had given some thought to getting out and 'doing" (as a means of not having to 'do' any housework..
But on checking the 'Weather channel" on-line, found out that the whole Province was under a SEVERE weather warning (-31 degrees C .. but no 'wind') decided that diving back into bed for another hour or so
would probably be a better choice.
Ken
 
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