Sprotbrough River Don Weir Doncaster Yorkshire

Discussion in 'Black And White' started by Ian-Barber, Mar 5, 2018.

  1. Ian-Barber

    Ian-Barber Admin Staff Member Registered User

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    This photograph of the weir at Sprotbrough Doncaster was made along the northern banks of the River Don which flows adjacent to Sprotbrough village.

    The film I chose to use was FomaPan 200 4x5 sheet film and the lens used was from a circa 1924 Voitlander AVUS plate camera.
    The negative was developed in PyroCatHD developer.

    Sprotbrough-Weir-Doncaster.png
     
    LEO, YorkshireBloke and David Webb like this.
  2. Alan9940

    Alan9940 Active Member Registered User

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    Very nice, Ian.
     
  3. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Active Member Registered User

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    It's definitely a very nice little lens Ian :D The image works well as do the others you've made with it.

    The German Patent DRP 21916 shows it's a sort of reverse Tessar that's hinted at in the Vade Mecum as mentioned by Kingslake (Head of Optics at Eastman Kodak who designed some of the Ektars)..

    [​IMG]

    I'd guess this particular design was to get around the Zeiss Tessar Patent, the lens was replace by the Skopar a Tessar clone

    I bought yet another 135mn lens just over a week ago a nice 13.5cm f4.5 Preminar in a Compur - of unknown design but from 1927/8 and only found on Zeiss Ikon cameras for a short spell, the shutter is a decade older according to it's SN.

    It's time I started a project using my pre-WWII and pre-WWI lenses.

    Ian
     
  4. YorkshireBloke

    YorkshireBloke Member Registered User

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    Wow! You don't half get some thorough answers on this Forum! :cool:Brilliant!

    Robert
     
  5. YorkshireBloke

    YorkshireBloke Member Registered User

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    I particularly like the water "detail"' not all white milk, some "texture".

    What shutter speed was it Ian?

    Robert
     
  6. Ian-Barber

    Ian-Barber Admin Staff Member Registered User

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    The shutter speed was 1/4 second @ f22
     
  7. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Active Member Registered User

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    I've lent Ian the lens he's used here, I had it off another member of this Forum. The Vade Mecum, a Lens Collectors guide to older lenses is very vague about this particular lens:

    Avuskop seen as an f7.5 135mm lens. This seems to be another triplet but note that Dr Kingslake lists an
    Avus as a reversed Skopar type design with 4 glasses, ie a "rasset" type design. Frerk notices it as a good
    low priced triplet.


    The Skopar is a Tessar type lens. In fact the German Patent no (DRP) is on the lens and a quick Google search brings up the reference to the Patent

    [​IMG]

    Ian
     
  8. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Active Member Registered User

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    I guess the question that needs asking Ian is what's you're impression of using a Vintage lens ? Being uncoated and 4 elements in 3 groups it'll have noticeably less contrast than a modern multi-coated lens.

    Ian
     
  9. Ian-Barber

    Ian-Barber Admin Staff Member Registered User

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    So far I am really enjoying the results I am getting. I have always wanted that lower contrast look, similar to what I see in the old books.

    The only part of using the lens I sometimes get confused with is that the f/stops are not the same as my light meter. It has values like f/9, f35 etc and. the shutter speeds have values such as 5
     
  10. David M

    David M Active Member Registered User

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    Older Weston meters have suitable calibrations. The dials look very crowded but they work perfectly well.
     
  11. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Active Member Registered User

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    It's not something I've given much thought to.

    I've used lenses with odd shutter speeds for so long I never give it much thought, only a few have older German apertures. Quite a few of my lenses use the 1 1/2 1/5 1/10 1/25 1/50 11/100 1/200 shutter speeds this was standard on Compurs and Compound also other German shutters, also US shutters as well.

    Apertures in 1/3 stops


    0.7 0.8 0.9 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.4 1.6 1.8 2 2.2 2.5 2.8 3.2 3.5 4 4.5 5.0 5.6 6.3 7.1 8 9 10 11 13 14 16 18 20 22 25 29 32 36 40 45 51 57 64 72 80 90


    Shutter speeds in 1/3 stops (seconds)


    2 1.6 1.3 1 0.8 0.6 1/2 0.4 0.3 1/4 1/5 1/6 1/8 1/10 1/13 1/15 1/20 1/25 1/30 1/40 1/50 1/60 1/80 1/100 1/125 1/160 1/200 1/250 1/320 1/400 1/500 1/640 1/800 1/1000


    ISO/EI Speed in 1/3 stops


    16 20 25 32 40 50 64 80 100 125 169 200 250 320 400 500 640 800 1000 1250 1600 2000 2500 3200 40000 5000 64000

    This should help Ian.

    Ian
     
    Last edited: Mar 11, 2018
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  12. Ian-Barber

    Ian-Barber Admin Staff Member Registered User

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    Excellent, thanks Ian, I shall make a small printable chart and being to memorise them
     
  13. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Active Member Registered User

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    I've posted it in the resources section as it'll be useful to others.

    Ian
     
  14. Stephen Batey

    Stephen Batey Well-Known Member Registered User

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    Should that be "11" rather than "1" between "10" and "13" in the apertures?

    I was prompted to Google "lens apertures US scale" and this link may be of interest as having some numbers. I can recall using cameras with f/4.5 and f/6.3 when I was young(er). I'd normally pop over to my shelves and get down a book, but a GOogle link is easier to share :)
     
  15. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Active Member Registered User

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    Strange Stephen, yes it should be 11, it's correct in the Resources section which was cut/pasted from this thread, which was itself a cut and paste from a Libre Office document so it's odd that happened.

    Ian
     

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