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thronobulax

Active Member
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New bellows now fitted. Still need an adapter for a shutter which I'm working on, and film holder (has been ordered) and lastly of course some film and the right conditions ..... The lens is a Grubb C which was one of the lenses used by Carleton Watkins, although his perhaps perished in the earthquake along with many of his photographs.
View attachment 2318
That's really beautiful. What was the source of your replacement bellows?
 

Paul Kay

Member
Registered User
They are from www.custombellows.co.uk - they originally made the bellows for the Gandolfis and supplied replacements very quickly indeed although I believe that they have been slower very recently due to covid related restrictions. I now have three cameras fitted with replacement bellows from them I can thoroughly recommend them.
 
A

Anthony

Guest
Custom Bellows is a wonderful resource. They've replaced several bellows on view cameras I own. The only problem is, if you have any cameras without them - even with light tight bellows - you have to get those refitted also . . . They just look so beautiful, yeah?

I want to get back to Paul's post about my KMV/Calumet 4x5 view camera. His point is well taken: a wood 4x5 is lighter, folds up smaller, and wood is nicer to the touch in cold weather. And Paul's camera has the same bellows capability. More in fact - you can fit a bag bellows to his.

So why do I use the heavier, bulkier, metal 4x5 camera? If this were a legal argument I'd be hard pressed to make it.

I'll merely say this - as someone that's been involved in photography for many years - I should probably have my head examined.

Maybe I'll have my head examined in Vienna! I can stop at a few cafes before my appointment . . . ? But the doctor may say my case is hopeless; and "maybe you should live somewhere besides America for a while, ja?"
 

Leicamadman

New Member
Registered User
Unfortunately the Titan moulds were lost by the company doing theABS casting , this happened to other companies as well, The moulds for the Paterson Orbital here also lost albeit for a different material.

Ian
I thought it was only the SF 5x4 that was affected by this - Mike Walkers other Cameras being still available? I hope so as I am thinking about buying another to add to my 5x4 SF.
 

David M

Well-Known Member
Registered User
He does indeed make other cameras in 5x4, 7x5 and 10x8 sizes. They are the wide-angle type. I presume that the greatest loss was the die for the base-plate, which is quite intricate. I have one of the last ten. The knobs are different from yours. He also makes the Ilford pinhole camera. A very helpful chap. Can't say how Covid will have affected the business.

 

Leicamadman

New Member
Registered User
Mine is serial number 005, one of the first he made and sold direct before he had distribution. He did upgrade it with spirit levels for me and made me a couple of extra lens boards for a grand sum of about £16 at the time. I have always found him very helpful as you say.
 

Keith Pitman

New Member
Registered User
Following the recent discussion about the relationship between Zone VI and Wisner cameras, here is the “Zone VI Classic”. It is the camera made by Wisner for Zone VI. Only about 150 were made. Afterwards, the companies parted and made their own line of cameras. C1EFB73A-E256-443B-A885-50B98283DF02.jpeg
 

David M

Well-Known Member
Registered User
Very similar to the Vermont-made version. The knobs are bulkier on the Picker model, the clip for keeping the folded camera shut is in a different place, there is an extra lower slide to hold the lens board and there seems to be some different metalwork on the side of the rear frame, which I can’t quite make out. It’s possible that the rotating back is clipped differently, too.
 

Keith Pitman

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Registered User
That’s not a lower slide, but a fixed stop for the bottom of the lensboard. I think what you see on the side of the rear frame is a brass surround for a level. The slides that secure the back are the same as those used on other Wisner made cameras.
 

David M

Well-Known Member
Registered User
I had meant that the Picker model had an extra slide. Yes, it could be a level; the Picker one has a level behind an oval cartouche, but higher up. There are two more on the back. The back itself is held by sliding clips, whereas it looks as though the Wisner has a spring-and-pin system, if that describes it adequately. There are other small differences, like the screw heads, but the similarity is very striking. They could easily be Mark I and Mark II from the same stable.
The Picker took a wooden lens-board slightly bigger than Linhof and an adaptor was easy to make for mine.
 

lharby

Member
Registered User
Recently upgraded to a Sinar 8x10 P1 (I already have a 4x5 F1). Nice thing is it has a 4x5 reducing back so I can shoot everything I did before with a few more options.

Apparently the camera was owned by a technician who worked for Terence Donovan, and I got it for what I think is a very good price.
 

Attachments

lharby

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Registered User
I also got a Graflex recently (which has been giving me lens/filter woes) but I really fancy an MPP.

And then I discovered these:

But that is 5x7 (as if I don't have enough problems o_O)
 

Ian Grant

Well-Known Member
Registered User
I also got a Graflex recently (which has been giving me lens/filter woes) but I really fancy an MPP.

And then I discovered these:

But that is 5x7 (as if I don't have enough problems o_O)
That Specialist 2 was a bargain at £100 with it's case, two lenses, and a darkcloth. The downside was the holders in the kit re Half plate but they are the same external size/fit as 7x5 DDS however rare and expensive here in the UK. I found some at a good price from someone I know in the US.

It's is here earler in this thread :D

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I made a conversion board so now I can use my Wista 45DX lenses with the camera particularly my 240mm Nikkor W, but also my 300mm Nikkor M and 360mm Tele Xenar. I made a similar conversion boarsd for my 10x8 Agf Ansco cameras.

I have 3 other 7x5 cameras, two needing restoration, it's becoming time to start selling off some excess cameras . . . . . . . . . 10x8, 7x5, and 5x4

Ian
 

lharby

Member
Registered User
That Specialist 2 was a bargain at £100 with it's case, two lenses, and a darkcloth. The downside was the holders in the kit re Half plate but they are the same external size/fit as 7x5 DDS however rare and expensive here in the UK. I found some at a good price from someone I know in the US.

It's is here earler in this thread :D
Super thank you for the link.

Is there any way this camera could be modified to shoot 4x5?
 

Ian Grant

Well-Known Member
Registered User
There was a 5x4 reducing back available from Kodak for the Specialist 2, while not in my 1960 Kodak Professional CAtalogue I have seen them for sale seperately and with cameras. Kodak made adapted Half plate DDS to take Quarterplate 4¼x3¼ film, and also Postcard sized 5½x3½ film. My camera came with a holder adapted to take 5x4, in fact checking I've at least 3 adapted for 5x4 and it's not difficult, I think I picked up some extra half palte holders and hadn't looked at them there was a sheet of FP4 in one - now fogged :D

It was quite common with older book form plate holders to have inserts to use samller sizes, in fact I think they are in a 1940 Kodak Professional cataloge.

Because of the Specialist 2 is a triple extension camera the bellows don't comress enough for particulary wide angle lenses, the cameras had an optional Dallmeyer 4¼" f6.5/11 Dalcoated wide angle lens (approx 110mm) set in a recessed lens board. f6.5 for focussing f11 widest for actual use. These came without a shutter. so the camera is not really suitable for wide angle work.

Ian
 
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