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David M

Well-Known Member
Registered User
Thank you. It looked to me as though you were supposed to fill in your own values for any three lenses you owned. I had guessed that pencilled (?) numbers had rubbed off. Presumably after setting the standards, you'd use the sliding tripod block to bring the image into focus at the desired magnification.

1:27 seems an odd magnification, as does 1:7.
1:2, 1:4 and 1:8 seem what you'd expect. Was there some special purpose for the others? I'm thinking of something like photographing a standard object such as (eg) a microscope slide to yield a convenient printed size for distribution or filing. Something half an inch long would just about fit a foolscap sheet.
I realise that it's not foolscap film. This is just thinking out loud.
 
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Ian Grant

Active Member
Registered User
Yes the markings for the 203mm Ektar are in pencil. In practice Kodak only sold the Specialist 2 camera with the Ektar which is excellent from Infinity to 1:1 due to its Dialyte design, and also the optional Dallmeyer Wide angle. The previous pre-WWII versions were sold with a choice of Ross, Cooke, and Dallmeyer lenses, Kodak were the distributors for Ross and Cooke lenses in some countries fir a while.

A measure was used to initially position the camera and no doubt the sliding block used for accurate focus which is why unlike any other field cameras it's got geared tracking for precision. I've definitely got articles somewhere on medical/clinical photography from the 1940's or 50's, probably earlier as well, next time I come across them I'll see what they say about magnifications.

I'd not thought of looking but I should also have the Press Release in the relevant BJP Almanac when the camera was released. Essentially there were three assembled kit versions, Laboratory, Clinical, and View.

Ian
 

Simon Hendy

New Member
Registered User
The excitement - my Italian 118/120 conversion widgets have arrived, so at the weekend I will be testing my Ansco No.3 with 120 rollfilm, and then it that's successful 1/4 plate sheet. Borderline l/f I know...
I've spent a few days trying out my dad's old Pentax collection - 9 cameras to work my way through!
2019-02-25 19.24.29.jpg
2019-02-25 21.18.13.jpg
 

Ian Grant

Active Member
Registered User
You need a film gate adapter to keep the film flat (at the edges), easy enough to make.

Ian
 

James T

Member
Registered User
You need a film gate adapter to keep the film flat (at the edges), easy enough to make.
That didn't really seem a major problem on my Autographic No 3 Kodak. More of a challenge was the advance as the window for 118 is at the edge of the film for 120.
For that I found a reasonable approximation using an empty backing paper:
Align the alignment arrow at the start of the gate and close the back.
7.5 complete turns to the start
2.5 turns per frame.
The spacing is a bit wide, but even with closer frames you wouldn't get 7 frames on the film.
 

Asha

New Member
Registered User
The excitement - my Italian 118/120 conversion widgets have arrived, so at the weekend I will be testing my Ansco No.3 with 120 rollfilm, and then it that's successful 1/4 plate sheet. Borderline l/f I know...
I've spent a few days trying out my dad's old Pentax collection - 9 cameras to work my way through!
View attachment 1477
View attachment 1478
Very much a specific adaptaion and I suspect it works well.
When in possession of numerous folders of obscure film formats, I made adaptaions using plastic rawlplugs to be able to use 120 film.
Somewhat crude but it worked!
 

Emmanuel Bigler

New Member
Registered User
Better late than never, two images of my Arca Swiss 5x4" F-metric camera

In the 5x4" configuration, fitted with a Schneider 360 Tele-Arton focused at infinity and the standard molded leather bellows. 210 mm of bellows draw at infinity in this telephoto configuration.

In the 6x9 cm configuration with a rollfilm back, the camera is looking over Besançon.
 

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