Pyrocat HD

Ian Grant

Active Member
Registered User
The technique taken to Steve's extremes looks odd when you make enlargements from smaller negative whether in a darkroom or by scanning because the edge effects are too exaggerated and pronounced, But used well it's great technique for contact printing,

It's about finding the right balance, I find the sharpness and acutance of Pryocat HD more than sufficient with standard agitation, but I only do two/three inversions per minute maybe 5 seconds.

Ian
 

Darren Lewey

New Member
Registered User
An excellent thread, many thanks. Does anyone have any updates on film choice or Pyrocat dev. times and film choice?
 

Ian Grant

Active Member
Registered User
I've used Pyrocat HD with Tmax 100 & 400, Acros, Fortepan 200, EFKE (Adox) PL25, Delta 100 & 400, HP5 and also Fpmapan 100 & 200, all with excellent results.

All the films get the same 17mins development @ 20ºC 1+1 to 100 n a Jobo 2000 tank or Paterson Systen 4 2 or 2 inversions every minute. water stop bath and Hypam or Ilford Raod fixer. The only exceptions are Fomapan 100 & 200 at half box speed which needs significantly less development 12 mins @ 20ºC, and for 10x8 sheet film I usually process 2+2 to 100 for 11 mins 20ºC in a tray.

These days I use Pyrocat HD for all my films, I predominantly shoot Delta 100 & 400 and HP5, Fortepan as a backup, but I still have some boxes of 10x8 EFKE PL25 and Fortepan 200 left. I guess I've been using the developer for about 14 years.

Ian
 

Ian Grant

Active Member
Registered User
Darren, when I tarted using Pyrocat HD it was with Tmax 100 mostly, and Tmax 400 in poorer light. Unlike some other staining dvelopers it gives finer grain. I move abroad in 2006 and found it impossible to get Tmax films In Turkey and South America (Chile & Peru), Ilford and Foma films were easy to find hence the switch. I don'tsee any difference in image quality between Tmax or Delta 100.

You do need to tame the contrast of Foma films with exposure and development but once you've done some tests and worked out your personal EI and development times the 100 & 200 are excellent films.

Ian
 

Darren Lewey

New Member
Registered User
Thanks Ian, the gritty, "dirty" look that some others have mentioned is not my thing so I'd try to avoid that. Of the images with great tonal range on your site which are splendid, can you point to the Foma examples. As an aside, I spent two years teaching at Doncaster college!
 

Ian-Barber

Admin
Staff member
Registered User
These were taken with Fomapan 200

Doncaster-Market-1024x822.jpg

IBP-2016-08-21-2400-1024x819.jpg

Magpie-Mine-1024x819.jpg

Wessenden-Head-Reservoir-1024x819.jpg

Were you teaching at the college in Waterdale or the one behind St Georges Church.
 

Ian-Barber

Admin
Staff member
Registered User
I was invited to give a talk on black and white digital conversion and Photoshop editing around 2012 but it got cancelled at the last minute. I was also given a tour of their darkroom and film developing area which was quite interesting.

At that time it was someone called Evan I believe who was running the darkroom. I have since tried to remake contact but to no avail.
 

KenS

Active Member
Registered User
I make up my Pyrocat HD developer from 'scratch' using the dry chemicals BECAUSE I cannot afford to purchase it in liquid form.... ready to dilute for use. Surely there must be a source in the UK for the ingredients. Careful measurement using readily available digital/electonic or the 'archaic' 3-beam balance scales should be able to SIGNIFICANTLY reduce the costs for 'regular' use.
I have never calculated the cost (per sheet of film) when compared to the much more readily available 'commercial' developers.
That being said... if my costs per sheet were the same, I would still 'stick' with Pyrocat HD over readily availabe "mix with water.. dilute as required and use" 'commercial' developers

Ken
 

mpirie

Member
Registered User
I've used Stillphotographic to buy some PF powdered Pyro-HD.

I haven't mixed it up yet until i finish the pre-mixed stuff first.

Mike
 

Ian Grant

Active Member
Registered User
I have quite a lot of expired film, never had a problem. Remember that ISO9002 compliance meant that all manufacturers had to shorten the Expiry dates on films from about 5 or 6 years to 2-3 years, more about stock control than expiry.

Ian
 
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