Printing 20x24 inch paper in a small darkroom.

Robert

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I currently print up to 16x20 inch paper in my darkroom but I want to be able to print the largest size paper my De Vere 405 enlarger will take which is 20x24 inches. However, the sink is too small to take 20x24 trays so I have decided to try a manual rotary drum method.
I managed to find a Jobdrum 4550 on eBay and have made up a simple manual roller base to take it but I haven't been able to find the correct holder insert that takes the 20x24 inch paper - holder No. 4512. I have had a "saved search" on eBay for the last few weeks but nothing has come up.
I have also seen a reference to a "Dev-tec 200a print processor for 16x20/20x24" color or black & white prints" as an alternative to the Jobodrum. I would be prepared to go down that route if I could find one.
I have posted a Wanted notice on this site for the Jobo insert.
Any advice on where to find one would be welcome.
 

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Ian Grant

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I had a very small darkroom for a while in the mid to late 80's, 6ft wide by 5ft deep, no sink. I made some 30"x24" fibre based prints using a single 24"x20" tray, and it was quite easy no failures. Essentially you see-saw the paper through the developer, pour the developer into a jug, then pour in the sop bath, then back into its own jug, then do the same with the fixer.

In your case just use the 20"x16" trays, or one 24"x20" tray, it;s quite simple.

Ian
 

Robert

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Thanks for the tip Ian. My sink is wide enough to accommodate a 20x24 tray so I might give that a try if I don't find one of these holders soon. They seem to be as rare as hen's teeth...
 

Ian Grant

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I've also taped large prints to a sheet of plastic and processed with a sponge for each solution works fine, wash in the bath.

Ian
 

David M

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One other thing to mention about the see-saw technique.
If you're using fibre-base paper, it will become heaver and more fragile. It's easy to put kinks in it that remain visible after drying. A slightly different method is to roll up the paper one way, then roll it up the other, rather like reading a scroll. A dry run is a good idea, to work out a modus operandi for your space, your trays and your own hands.
If you can find unperforated window boxes, they might work, too.
 

Alan Clark

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Registered User
I too have used the single tray method as described by Ian. It is important to wash the tray well after it has had fixer in it, before pouring developer in to do the next print.

Alan
 

Robert

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Thanks for the tips Gentlemen. The giant plastic drip tray I have under my incontinent 1971 Rover 3.5 liter V8 P5B is looking like a contender! I just have to clean up the gearbox oil first...
 
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