Looking for a 4 by 5

lewis phillips

New Member
Registered User
hello all.

Does anyone have a 4 by 5 field camera they would be interested in selling. Kind regards. Lewis
 

mpirie

Member
Registered User
Have you looked at the Ffordes.com website?

They have several 5x4's for sale, but i'd suggest making sure you understand what you will use the camera for and what capabilities you will need. For example, the cheapest 5x4 cameras tend to be "studio" based which makes them less portable than "field" cameras but normally more capable.

Mike
 

mpirie

Member
Registered User
Of course, there is always the auction site which can sometimes be a crap-shoot if you don't fully know what you're looking for.

Another option is physical auctions of photographic equipment that take place in various places.

Mike
 

Ian Grant

Well-Known Member
Registered User
Of course, there is always the auction site which can sometimes be a crap-shoot if you don't fully know what you're looking for.

Another option is physical auctions of photographic equipment that take place in various places.

Mike

I buy the dodgy crappy cameras on Ebay when really cheap :D Two MPP MkIII's for £70, OK I spent another £20 on a missing back, both now fully restored.

It started after I rebuilt a basket case Quarter plate camera. Then I bought two Sped Graphics from the US for $70 two parts camears but enough to rebuild one, only issue was one was pre-Anniversary the other a Pacemaker and there were NO common parts :D Both now restored.

The problem is at the moment there's very few bargains on Ebay or elsewhere because the lock downs mean the items aren't being found and sold. It might surprise you that a lot of Ebay items are found & bought at at Car Boot sales.

It's a bit of a minefield as many prices are rather overinflated.

Ian
 

Paul Kay

Member
Registered User
If you want something cheap and cheerful but quality which can be used in the field, I have a 1950s Linhof Colour monorail which is going cheap. Its a studio camera which I would say is quite light enough to use in the field. Lens boards are readily available and as far as I can tell the bellows look ok. Its beautifully made as you might expect from Linhof and whilst used is still perfectly usable. Its not an ideal field camera, but I can sell it for £150 + post (excluding lens board/lens, cloth and film holders which you will need for any camera), and would make a good 'entry' try out' camera I'm sure. I'm downsizing my acquisitions ..... See in the Buy & Sell.
 

Alan Clark

Active Member
Registered User
Hello Lewis, I have a Shen Hao TZ 45-11A that I could sell as I prefer using my home-made cameras. This is a folding 5x4 wooden Field Camera in black walnut and aluminium, in very nice condition as it hasn't had a lot of use. Complete with spare lens board but no lenses. I believe there are a couple on ebay at about £1200 with a lens, so I would accept £700 plus postage.
I can post some pictures if you are interested.

Alan
 

Paul Kay

Member
Registered User
I do have a Gandolfi 5" x 4" Precision which I might just sell (because it takes smaller diameter lenses than those that I am now utilising) but it is only lightly used and in very good condition so is not going to be a particularly cheap option. That said, it won't be silly money either, and is lightweight, beautifully built (as you might expect) and easy to set up. It has a 0 sized lens board and if interested I can measure the backing support hole diameter (which determines the maximum diameter lens which can be used). It has an original , non-standard front - not unusual because Gandolfi built to customers requirements - bu lens boards are easy to make and the correct timber is available in the UK from CITES certified suppliers.
 

Anthony

New Member
Registered User
I have an old Cambo SC 4x5 that I refurbished. Replaced knobs and installed bushings - Cambo calls them "brakes" - for the rise and fall. And I have lensboards and a few spare groundglass screens you can have with it. Bellows in good shape. I even have a newer rail clamp for it - the only component of the newer models that was better than the old one - I think. I have an old Calumet case I can pack it in . . . no lens though.
 

thronobulax

Member
Registered User
IF you don't need a lot of camera movements...

The old 4x5 Graphics are a marvelous way to jump into large format at low cost. So long as the bellows are tight and the camera is in otherwise decent repair, these are terrific shooters. I have both the 4x5 Speed and a "Baby" 2x3 Speed. They're great when what you're shooting doesn't require significant movements and portability and weight are the main concern. Also, the Kodak Ektars frequently found on these cameras are razor sharp and contrasty.

I don't know the market in the UK, but a nice, serviceable 4x5 Crown or Speed Graphic can be had here in the use for $300-ish USD with the aforementioned Ektar. (The focal plane shutters on the old Speeds are more-or-less useless so you do want a leaf shuttered lens).

P.S., It is possible to reverse the front standard on a Graphic thereby giving yourself ample front tilt for most things. This makes any onboard rangerfinder useless, but that's only a factor is you shoot the camera handheld (which I have ... many times). In any case, reversing/restoring that standard is pretty easy to to.
 

Ian Grant

Well-Known Member
Registered User
I have both Crown and a couple of Speed Graphics, their lack of decent movemnents makes them frustrating to use. The upside of the Speed Graphics is their Focal Plane shutters which certainly aren't "more or less useless" quite the opposite they can be extremely useful. But then I've stripped down and serviced both my Speed Graphics and the shutters work smoothly and well.

My Speed Graphics tend to get used with shutter less lenses, a 10" Petzval, a 14" Military (Dallmeyer) telephoto and their advantage is speeds up to 1/1000 while an equivalent large feaf shutter typically has a top speed of 1/100 (Compund) or 1/125 (Copal 3) or even slower 1/50 with the larger US Alpax or Betax shutter.

A better suggestion is the Graflex Super Graphic, I've been using one for about 12 years, while it doesn't have as wide a range of movements as my Wista 45DX it has enough for my landscape work and is easy to use hand held. Toyo bought the tooling etc and made Toyo Super Graphis in Japan eventually replacing them with the Toyo 45A.

If I was replacing my Wist I'd most likely buy a Shen Hao TZ 45-11A like the one Alan Clark has mentioned, I had a play with one while in Canada a few yearsago.

Ian
 

Anthony

New Member
Registered User
I agree with Ian. I was offering field cameras for sale mail order about 20 years ago and thought the Shen Hao was the best one. It seemed rugged, well-built and easier to use. But in general I never liked the Deardorff-copy fold-into-a-box designs; always preferred the old flat bed configuration like the Seneca or Ansco. You know - where the bed folds up against the ground glass - the Calumet and Orbit 8x10 metal cameras are based on that design. This remains one of my questionable compulsions about wooden cameras, so ignore.

Alan Ross told me he still misses his Nagoaka 4x5, and he certainly knows. You absolutely cannot beat that design for travel. The Toyo field camera seems very good - may have to replace the bellows.

Lastly - when I use ebay, I try to buy from Japanese sellers rather than Americans. I'm a Yank so I can say that, eh? The Japanese answer to a higher standard, always deliver what they promise, often more. If there's a problem, they'll make good on it.

I wish the Brits would make a wooden Ansco design camera with a saddle leather handle and brass hardware. . . call it the "Triumph."

Ahhh, for the old SEI photometer - eh?
 
Last edited:

mpirie

Member
Registered User
Lol, it wasn't that long ago Anthony that "Triumph" was a byword for shoddy production and unreliability :)

Be careful what you wish for :cool:

Mike
 

Ian Grant

Well-Known Member
Registered User
I wish the Brits would make a wooden Ansco design camera with a saddle leather handle and brass hardware. . . call it the "Triumph."
We did make a similar design camera but it was Half plate rather than 5x4, the Koda Ltd Specialist 2, essentially a2D/B but the front and rear standard ran in aluminium not wood with geared front and rear focussing, geared rise/fall, a geared tripod block - a precision camera with a leather handle :D

Ian
 

Anthony

New Member
Registered User
Many, many years ago my older sister drove an English sports car (it was about 10 years old when she bought it). Once she took it to a mechanic who specialized in them. She said the car made a screeching noise from the rear (it needed a wheel bearing). The mechanic looked at her and said, "Is that the only thing you can find wrong with this car"? :oops:

Well anyway, the SEI was the best meter ever conceived and built . . .

Anthony
 

thronobulax

Member
Registered User
Does anyone else remember the phrase, Lucas, Prince Of Darkness?

(Lucas Electric being the purveyor of the wiring systems on Austin Healy and MG if I recall correctly.)
 

Paul Kay

Member
Registered User
Indeed I do. That said, I ran a Norton Commando (should have kept it) which had Lucas Rita electronic ignition and this transformed it into being a reliable starter, so Lucas built some useful stuff.
 

Camerashy

New Member
Registered User
I jumped right in and bought a second hand, as new Chamonix F1, my intention was to buy a camera that did everything and probably more than I need. Chamonix cameras hold their value, I have no worries about losing money if I decide to sell in the future if I do not get on with large format photography.
 
Top