Late developer...

Discussion in 'Say Hello & Introduce Yourself' started by YorkshireBloke, May 7, 2018.

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  1. YorkshireBloke

    YorkshireBloke Member Registered User

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    Ho All,

    So this is odd... I have been posting since Feb 3 and it has just dawned in me that I haven't posted in "Say Hello": how rude you must think I am! ;)

    I post now as I have JUST made my first exposures, 6:30 am, 7.5.18, landscape. I knew the shot I want needed me to wait until the end of July for the sun to be right but I bought Jim Edge's MPP late February and it is well past one I got some experience "in the field".

    Thanks to everyone who has given tips and hints on what to do, especially Ian B who was very happy to show me how to take my first sheets and even process them immediately after so I got instant feedback :). I will return to Cusworth Hall with you Ian, when time permits :rolleyes:.

    OK, so we all know that sheet film photography makes for a slower, more reflective style but 4 exposures in about 12 weeks may be more Glacial than Considered! :confused:.

    And now I just have to buy and mix chemicals, gain a light tight environment, load and process the sheets then find a pal to scan the results and you can help me with some more feedback!

    Anyhow, the main thing this morning was that I DID like the shooting style and think I managed not to fog the films (we will see...). Ian B had warned me that sometimes the number of steps can be so daunting that prospective view camera workers return to 35 mm or roll film or even :eek: :mad: :p DigiWorld when faced with the reality of view camera practice.

    Onwards!

    Robert
     
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  2. Alan9940

    Alan9940 Active Member Registered User

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    Congratulations, Robert on your first foray into LF work. Yes, LF does not suffer fools kindly, but if your personality likes a slower more methodical pace of creating images, then it’s the perfect format. You will make mistakes...lots of ‘em...but, we all have and it’s just part of the learning process. It can become addictive though. I started out with 5x4 nearly 40 years ago, and moved up to 10x8 a few years after that. The larger 10x8 format has been my favorite format for 30+ years. Once you get some field experience with that “miniature” format and feel more comfortable with the view on the gg, imagine viewing your actual print size (assuming contact printing) directly on the gg; that’s 10x8! I don’t know what that does to my own pee brain, but something happens during image creation! Like I said...addictive!!

    Anyway, enjoy!
     
  3. David M

    David M Active Member Registered User

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    Latte Developer? Is that a version of Caffenol?
     
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  4. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Active Member Registered User

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    Better late than never :D

    LF is good fun you'll enjoy it far more relaxing than smaller formats.

    Ian
     
  5. Stephen Batey

    Stephen Batey Well-Known Member Registered User

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    "LF" of course is the acronym for "Lots of Fun".

    Well done on the first steps. I found that after leaving 35mm for 6x7, it was a steady progression upwards. So far, I haven't felt a need to go to 11x14 or larger...
     
  6. David M

    David M Active Member Registered User

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    Although Ian B has (rightly) warned you about the number of steps involved, no step is difficult on its own. The level of complexity compares well with ploughing through the menus on advanced DSLRs.
    You will certainly find some steps are more important to your own way of working. Some photographers pride themselves on the remarkable speed with which they can erect the tripod; some may value their ability to wait for the scene to be exactly right. Some are prolific, some frugal. There are both farmers and hunters. As we have seen here, the process of development can be fascinating.
    Once the negative is made, there are many possible ways to make the print. Not only that, but there are many ways to assess if the print is successful. Some photographers value beauty within the print, some its truth to the original scene. Others may see the image as part of a larger project with different objectives. There are traditional approaches and experimental ones. You will discover your own way, and it may surprise you.
     
  7. YorkshireBloke

    YorkshireBloke Member Registered User

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    P
    [QUOTE="There are traditional approaches and experimental ones. You will discover your own way, and it may surprise you.[/QUOTE]

    Well put; thank you.

    Robert
     

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