Keeping time of Print developer

James T

Member
Registered User
Does anyone have a feel for how long Ilford Multigrade developer should keep? Is 18-months in the fridge an unreasonable length of time?

This morning I pulled my concentrate out of the fridge, and quite frankly it looked like Rodinal concentrate. I did try a few prints this afternoon (what else to do on a wet Saturday?) but the blacks were not very black as might be expected of developer that's gone off.
 

Ian Grant

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Registered User
Ilford print developers were reformulated a few years ago and now use Dimezone instead of Phenidone, despite Kodak's claims about Dimezone keeping better the reverse is true in practice and shelf lifves are shorter. Dimezone is a Kodak equivalent of Phenidone although the Patents for both have expired and 3rd party companies manufacture them.

When Ilford out sourced their chemistry to Champion theu switched to Dimezone, onlyMicrophen and Bromophen both powder developers still use Phenidone. I mix my own as concentrate using Phenidone and developer lasts a couple of years on the darkroom shelf.

Storing concentrated chemistry in a fridge is not a good idea as you could easily precipitate some of the Carbonate and Sulphite.

Ian
 

Alan9940

Active Member
Registered User
I've never used Ilford Multigrade Print Developer, but I have used other liquid print developers and, personally, I don't use any of 'em beyond one year. Long ago, though, I started mixing my own chemistry because 1) I tend to use formulas no longer available commercially, and 2) I know the brew is fresh. However, occasionally I get lazy and will buy some liquid developers.
 

Ian Grant

Well-Known Member
Registered User
Alan, have you seen my recommended concentrates here. Actually I found how Ilford adapted their powdered PQ developers to Liquid Concentrates through an example developer in a Patent, You can't do this with an MQ developer as the Metol won't keep in a highly alkali solution.

Essentially you replace the Sodium Carbonate with a bit less Potassium Carbonate and some Sodium or Potassium Hydroxide to achieve the same pH, taht achieves greater solubility. Agfa use(d) less Carbonate and more Hydroxide because it's cheaper, not 100% sure about Kodak but Liquid Dektol (formerly Polydol) is a Dimezone based PQ version of D72/Dektol.

Ian
 

Alan9940

Active Member
Registered User
Ian,

A couple of questions about the concentrated ID-62:

1) What is the general tonality (before toning) of the print? Like PQ Universal? D72 (what I use now)?
2) What's the shelf life at room temp? (Not that my home is close to normal room temps during the hot months; most of the year, btw)

Thanks!
 

Ian Grant

Well-Known Member
Registered User
ID-62 (concentrate) is sold as PQ Universal it has a neutral tone. it's Ilford's equivalent of D72/Dektol. In my darkroom which has a fairly even temperature of around 20ºC all year it keeps a good 18 months.

If you want warmer tones you leave out the Benzotriazole and add more Bromide and a touch of Carbonate which gives you ID-78 sold as Harman Warm Tone Developer as a concentrate

Ian
 
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