Gothic Arch

Christophe

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Gothic folly arch in Gunnersbury Park.
Expired HP5 at EI200 developed in Ilfotec HC 6.30 minutes.
f32 @ 22 seconds to take into account reciprocity.
Early days in 5x4, much to learn. It is not the most exciting composition, but I liked the texture of the brick. Perhaps too much foreground? There is another niggle or few, but will let those get called out.
 

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David M

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A niggle or two, then...
In monochrome, the foreground isn't really earning its keep. Perhaps those fallen leaves were attractively coloured? Raising the front standard might seem a good idea, but would the bare branches be an improvement? The light seems a bit diffuse, so things might be better the next time.
One thing I'd certainly suggest if you do return, is to move the tripod to the left, so that the mid-grey trunk behind the mid-grey arch is concealed and the edge is better defined by the darkness behind.
You put your head where it looks right and then put the camera where your head was.
But you're doing well. Keep at it, please.
 

Alan Clark

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Christophe, the light wasn't kind to you. You need to go back on another day when there is some directional light which might put some more texture into the brickwork and get the arch to stand out more from the trees. Interesting that David suggests getting rid of the tree that is half hidden by the left side of the arch. I wonder if it would be more interesting to move slightly to the right so that you see the whole of the trunk. It might then be a focal point, framed by the arch.

Alan
 

David M

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Alan has put his finger on the nub. The light hasn't been kind. He might well be right about the tree, too.
 

Christophe

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Thank you David and Alan, I appreciate the feedback. Indeed, the tree is a big niggle. I thought of putting it in the centre, but then opted for taking it out altogether. However, the low light through the GG resulted in me missing it still being partially there... The light was frustrating that day as there was an early morning glow just above the apex of the arch which disappeared as I exposed, not to be seen again that day (I gave up after 25 minutes waiting). I wonder if less depth of field would have also been of use, together with better light and a better position.

This lens has almost zero capacity for movement (135 mm with 161mm image circle), although I have found another one (150 mm with 210mm image circle). The 150 won't help me on coming up with a better composition or select the light, but does perhaps give more flexibility. I want to stick with one lens for a while.

I cropped the image, which does not save it, but removes some of the dead space (my 9 year old son remarked, that the first one was boring, the cropped one was "well, a little better"). He quite rightly observed that there was too much of nothing in the original. I may ask him to help find compositions going forward :).

Thank you again for your thoughts, very helpful.
 

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Ian Grant

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I think perhaps the contrast is a little too low:

1609673999788.png

Maybe less of a crop to include the leaf;

1609674153019.png

Ian
 

Christophe

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Thank you Ian, much obliged and appreciated. Trying to find the right balance using a screen for the right tonality which reminds me that I have not recalibrated my screen in a month. I must use the contrast more.
 

Alan Clark

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I cropped the image, which does not save it, but removes some of the dead space (my 9 year old son remarked, that the first one was boring, the cropped one was "well, a little better"). He quite rightly observed that there was too much of nothing in the original. I may ask him to help find compositions going forward :).

Thank you again for your thoughts, very helpful.
Here is an idea for you. Make your son a viewing frame, i.e. a piece of card with a 5x4 aperture cut out of it, and a length of cord so he can hang it round his neck. The cord should be just the right length so when fully extended the viewing frame window has the same width of view as your lens. Then set him to work!

Alan
 

Christophe

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Here is an idea for you. Make your son a viewing frame, i.e. a piece of card with a 5x4 aperture cut out of it, and a length of cord so he can hang it round his neck. The cord should be just the right length so when fully extended the viewing frame window has the same width of view as your lens. Then set him to work!

Alan
I will probably end up with eleventy billion photos of Lego or model airplanes, but that could be a good study and will certainly develop his eye (and help improve my composition :)).
 
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