Do You Scan & Print or Darkroom Print

Discussion in 'Talk About Digital Printing' started by Ian-Barber, Aug 8, 2016.

  1. KenS

    KenS Active Member

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    After some re-reading throughout these few pages, may I offer some recommended reading for those who might be interested in a number of the archaic non-silver printing processes that you might be willing to explore... and with which they might be willing to try. As I mentioned in an earlier post, I now much prefer to 'invest' both in my 'un-dark' darkroom' time.. and limited funds, to work more in the non-silver processes.

    A number of years ago, after gleaning some of the basic information on the "How-to's" on-line I decided to invest in a (somewhat) expensive tome by Christopher James after the local library decided that there being be an extremely small readership population, it might be better if I were to purchase my own copy.

    (Christopher James' Alternative Photographic Processes. ISBN-13: 978-1-4180-7372-5)...) but there has been an updated 'issue' since this first graced my bookshelf. (2nd edition has some 600 pages of great reading).

    Many practitioners have come to regard this book as "THE" book if you decide to enter into the foray... and have to admit that I have to agree with their recommendation. This book has allowed me to enjoy and explore and greatly expand my photographic 'print' options using that portion of the light spectrum without direct sunlight. While these processes are MUCH slower than current silver-gelatin print emulsions, I feel the time, effort and results are still well worth the investment.

    Ken
     
  2. KenS

    KenS Active Member

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    Last edited: Sep 28, 2017
  3. martin-f5

    martin-f5 New Member

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    I worked for nearly 32 years in my darkroom till I got a wonderful Epson printer 7880 which serves me with so many finest prints especially on Hahnemühle photorag and baryta. I felt in love with colors but in the end I again felt to go back to the silver-gelatin prints.
    It's nothing compared to a night in the darkroom.
    agfa.jpg

    I don't have a scanner and so 4x5 can only come to paper in a wet-darkroom.
     
  4. KenS

    KenS Active Member

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    Many of the 'archaic' print processes are 'printing-out' onto 'regular 'acid free watercolour paper that you have already 'painted on the non-silver emulsion with a brush or a glass-rod 'Puddle pusher' rather than 'developing out' in a tray with a 'liquid' some of them may require slightly acid 'first' bath followed by a good wash and you may finish things off with room lights "on", before hanging up to 'dry'

    They can be a'bit' more labour/time intensive... but they are just much,if not more, FUN to make.
    YOU need not have to rely on the sun.. especially in the UK. YOU can purchase or build your own light source (as I had to do)using UV wavelength emitting fluorescent tubes.
    MY exposures run (mostly)from 20 to 30 minutes


    Ken
     
    Last edited: Sep 30, 2017
  5. KenS

    KenS Active Member

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    Dave, have just scanned the front and back cover of Richard Farber's "Hiistoric Photographic Processes' if you cann provide me with an off-list email address I'm ready to forward those scans to you rather than taking up unnecessary space space in the server.

    Ken
     
  6. Joanna Carter

    Joanna Carter New Member

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    I tend to scan on an Epson V700 with a BetterScanning film holder; print "proofs" or up to A3+ on an Epson SC-P600, or send the files to Ilford for silver printing on their laser up to 50" wide.

    The results from Ilford are stunning and every bit the equal (IMHO) to a darkroom print.

    I have taught myself how to use Photoshop in a similar manner to creating a darkroom print. I dodge and burn by creating layers, adjusting curves for one particular area of the image that needs adjusting, then masking out the rest of the layer with a very soft edge. A process that can end up with several layers, each for with their own "contrast", all blended into one final image.

    I once had the privilege of being a member of Lancashire Monochrome and met with Dave Lewis, who used to be a master printer (wet darkroom) and he told me that some prints could take up to 28 exposures! I've not had to use that many layers so far but, I have had to use around 10
     

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