Anyone using 8x10?

Discussion in 'Talk About Large Format Gear' started by Isabel, Sep 10, 2016.

  1. Alan Clark

    Alan Clark Member Registered User

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2016
    Messages:
    266
    Likes Received:
    22
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Ryedale North Yorkshire
    David, your point was good enough to be made twice! There is indeed a big difference between making a few film holders for your own use in a workshop with limited facilities, and a production run of film holders being manufactured with hi-tech computer-controlled machinery.

    Alan
     
  2. David M

    David M Well-Known Member Registered User

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2017
    Messages:
    1,058
    Likes Received:
    89
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    South London
    Happy New Year, Alan,
    (and everybody)
    I had considered making the holders by laminating cut-out sheets in various thicknesses to make the holders. Perfectly feasible, but very labour-intensive by hand. What baffled me was the comb-shaped springs in the light-trap; I really couldn't see myself doing all that with a piercing-saw. Rather than inventing a new kind of light-trap, (...staggered silicone draught sealers?) I gave up. I have subsequently discovered that they are called finger-strip, or finger-stock and are used in all sorts of variations for making adaptive seals.
    I was saved from bellows-making at the paper prototype stage by finding a very cheap set of Sinar bellows on eBay.
    If only I had had a domestic laser-cutter and an ultrasonic welder, who knows?
     
  3. Alan Clark

    Alan Clark Member Registered User

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2016
    Messages:
    266
    Likes Received:
    22
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Ryedale North Yorkshire
    David,
    Happy new year to you too; and to everyone else as well.
    I asked for two books about James Ravilious for Christmas, and only got one... Perhaps I should have asked for an ultrasonic welder.
    Regarding your laminated cut-out sheets; you probably know that thin Birch ply, available from model shops in 1.5 and 3mm thicknesses, is high quality stuff for this kind of use. I've used it a lot in camera making.

    I find bellows making good fun (sadly...) The hardest part is finding the right material.

    Thank you for the advice about finger-strip. Not heard of it but will look it up. ( I feel as though I am about to start sliding down a slippery film-holder-making slope here. As though I didn't have enough to do.)

    Alan
     
  4. David M

    David M Well-Known Member Registered User

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2017
    Messages:
    1,058
    Likes Received:
    89
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    South London
    I've also spent some time, off and on, looking for fabric for both bellows and dark-cloths. There are online stores selling outdoor fabrics that are worth searching, and ThorLabs sell a lightproof material that seems to be used for shielding experimental laser set-ups. You may have discovered these already, of course.
    I have an Intrepid 10x8 and a darkslide due for delivery in the middle of February. Not the first on this forum, but I'll post something about the dark slide when it comes. My first reaction to their specification was that aluminium sheaths may be more subject to damage than plastic or carbon-fibre ones would be. We must assume that they know their own business.
    Other goodies are promised, like a light-source that converts a camera to an enlarger, by replacing the camera back, which opens up all sorts of possibilities. No doubt we can all think of useful things that we'd like to see and perhaps we should let them know. The wider their appeal, the better chance they have of continuing to feed the LF world.

    My own conclusion is that it's not quite worth it, to make dark slides up to 10x8, but after that, prices seem to soar to Ferrari and Rolex levels.
     
  5. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Active Member Registered User

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2017
    Messages:
    705
    Likes Received:
    110
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    West Midlands
    Home Page:
    David, the Thor labs material is excellent for the inner lining, I have about a dozen sets of bellows to make. In the past I've made bellows from material I make/light-proof myself, but I really make this for shutters Thornton Pickard roller blind, and older SLR shutters I also supply one of the leading repairers in the US with shutter cloth for 7x5 Portrait Graflex cameras - they use an 8" x 60" (approx) sutter curtain.

    A number of people in the US started to make and sell Whole Plate, 10x8, and mostly larger DDS but prices were so high they never sold many.

    Ian
     
  6. David M

    David M Well-Known Member Registered User

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2017
    Messages:
    1,058
    Likes Received:
    89
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    South London
    "...made light-proof myself"
    I hadn't thought that I'd be able to do that reliably on my domestic scale, so well done. I presume you have a secret method.
    Incidentally, I'm astonished at the length of the shutter blinds. Without much thinking, I'd assumed that each blind would be a bit bigger than the format (say, 8"wide for a 7" opening), plus a bit extra to wrap round the rollers at each end. I've never used one, so my opinion might well be worthless.
    Somewhere on the web is an account of making a ULF film holder using lolly-sticks as a spacer. Who would have thought?
     
  7. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Active Member Registered User

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2017
    Messages:
    705
    Likes Received:
    110
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    West Midlands
    Home Page:
    David, the Graflex style shutter is a continuos lenght with a number of different sized slits, the largest being used for T as it's more than the frame size, the narrowestmaybe 1/4" or less is used for 1/100o and 1/500. It's a lazy system used by a small no of UK manufacrurers as well. They aren't self capping ie stay open while retensioning

    The best UK and German SLRs use a twin shutter curtain system the Thornton Pickard Ruby reflexes use a modular shutter and mirror box, a Leica shutter is just a very scaled down version.

    Ian
     
  8. David M

    David M Well-Known Member Registered User

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2017
    Messages:
    1,058
    Likes Received:
    89
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    South London
    Now I understand. Conceptually neat but practically clumsy. I'd assumed that all blind shutters used two curtains and some cunning gears.
     
  9. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Active Member Registered User

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2017
    Messages:
    705
    Likes Received:
    110
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    West Midlands
    Home Page:
    They start as one continuous curtain like the TP roller blind shutters, first made to fit on the front of a lens then between lens and lens board, scaled up as Focal Plane shutters, but a single full aperture and you vary the tension, with an optional speed dial.

    Then high speed TP shutters up to 1/1000 appear these use a narrow slit. I have a Focal plane version but it must have been very impractical except for specialist use, how do you compose/focus with a narrow slit at a T setting :D. It needs the curtain replacing so I'll most likely make two curtains a practical full slit width 1/10 to 1/90 and a replacement fast one and corresponding speed dial and fit the regular curtain.

    The Graflex hutters are OK, I've restored quite a few and have two Speed Graphics with great shutters both restored and a Postcard sized Graflex SLR to work on - I've bought modern 9x12 DDS (same size outside dimensions as 5x4) and they will fit OK so while not quite Postcard width much better than wasting 5x4 film - 9x12 is readily available as it's the Continental European equivalent format.

    Ian
     
    Last edited: Jan 1, 2018
  10. David M

    David M Well-Known Member Registered User

    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2017
    Messages:
    1,058
    Likes Received:
    89
    Trophy Points:
    48
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    South London
    The narrow-slit version might have been useful in situations like winning-post photography, where everything is predictable, with no need to focus after the initial set-up.
     
  11. KenS

    KenS Active Member Registered User

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2016
    Messages:
    302
    Likes Received:
    202
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    retired REGISTERED Bilogical Photographer
    Location:
    Alberta, Canada
    About 10 (or so) years ago, I inherited a 8x10 Burke and James 'woodie' that I decide might look a little 'better if the 'battleship-grey' paint were removed with a paint remover that would not cause any 'damage' to the wood beneath.
    When the paint was removed, the wood was 'Brushed with a clear oil-based finish. I made a lensholder from some plywood that would allow me to affix my 240mm lens already mounted in a Linhof board. It works really nicely as a wide angle lens. but it does restricts the amount of swing or shift that may be used. However I have to admit I'm now seeking a a front-mounted shutter to attach to my 480mm Apo-Ronar or.... go back to my 'early years' and find bowler hat that could serve as a 'hand-held' shutter

    Ken
     

Share This Page