Anyone using 8x10?

Discussion in 'Talk About Large Format Gear' started by Isabel, Sep 10, 2016.

  1. Alan9940

    Alan9940 Active Member Registered User

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    I frequently make digital negatives for pt/pd printing. I enlarge MF to approx 10x8 and I've been known to make a digital neg from a 10x8 neg, depending on what paper I'm printing on due to sticking from increased humidity levels of the paper.
     
  2. Diz

    Diz Member Registered User

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    Not quite a 10x8, I have nearly finished re furbing an FKD 18x24 cm. I got it to do wet plate, but it came with 2 DDslides. So one has been converted for wet plate, the other will be used for film. It cost £292, came with 2 DDS, 300mm lens and shipped from Ukraine. It has an Elephant shutter. You take the lens cap off and count 1 Elephant,2 Elephant etc. It has front rise and shift, rear tilt and swing. Quite under engineered so wobbles a bit, but so does everything else after pouring a couple of plates:confused:. I have managed to get 2, 7x5 images with it so far. An insert made from 3mm acrylic and silver wire was used. I intend to make another for 8x6. That will give me 3 formats from 1 DDs. Its been an interesting and fun journey so far.
    Cheers
    Diz
     
    Last edited: Sep 19, 2016
  3. KenS

    KenS Active Member Registered User

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    I have been giving serious thought to getting into carbon and/or carbon transfer printing as a means of a 'self challenge'. I 'rescued' the white front door outer cover off a neighbour's dish washer (with his permission) after it was 'put out' for disposal. I recently purchased some a few feet of 'magnetic tape' for holding the paper 'down' which also provides for a 'dam' for pouring the 'glop' (check Dr. Sandy King's website). I have a relatively inexpensive home-made UV light-box which has proven it worth for other non-silver processes. All I now need is to do some re-reading and then 'find the guts' and the time to get it all up and going... after I 'invest' in replenishing my stock of Pictorico for making digitally 'enlarged' negatives. I can but hope the 'learning slope' is not too steep.

    Ken
     
  4. Pete Oakley

    Pete Oakley New Member Registered User

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    I have a Sinar collection which includes an 8x10 back and a Sinar Copal shutter. I do venture out with it now and then but I favour an anglers trolley to move it. I know somebody with a pre war Agfa Ansco and it is really portable and has the benefit of front and rear swing. I've heard the build quality of Agfa Ansco's criticised but this is really good.
     
  5. KenS

    KenS Active Member Registered User

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    The Sinar is a GREAT camera. When 'working' we had an early '50's Linhof Technika... a solid piece of equipment. Since I had a Linhof monorail 'at home' when the time came to a much needed 'update' to much of the late 40's and early '50' hardware and having had some 'hands-on' experience with a friend's Sinar, I invited the Sinar distributer's rep. to drop by and provide for a hands-on 'demonstration' for 'the Boss'...and the head of Administration (who had to OK the investment). Both were more than 'surprised' of the benefits of the off-axis tilts and swings that would make a lot of our work more than just 'somewhat' easier/faster while it allowing for greater extensions than the Technika for a lot of the 1:1 (and higher) magnification work that was required on an almost daily basis. If I had the need for a new monorail (and the $$ to spend), the Sinar would be my camera of choice... The film-plane metering 'prod' proved itself in the studio on a daily basis... reducing the time spent on mental exposure calculations on a 'daily basis'.

    Ken
     
  6. Graham Patterson

    Graham Patterson Member Registered User

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    I finally had a chance to take my 'hardware store special' 8x10 out in the field - if briefly on the way into work. I am not sure if I will stay with the larger format, but it did not cost much in money or time in order to experiment.

    http://grahamp.dotinthelandscape.org/8x10.html

    Now the temptation is see if I can modify my Beseler enlarger to handle it :cool:
     
  7. Mathieu Bauwens

    Mathieu Bauwens Active Member Registered User

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    Nicely done, Graham !
     
  8. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Active Member Registered User

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    I think yo mean this camera Pete :D

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    Folds up neatly and is portable, I've hiked across the North York Moors with it to meet a fellow member here (Alan Clarke). This is the Agfa Ansco Commercial View has an extension for the bed, 36" bellows draw few have front swing though. This particular camera was owned by a former student and later lecturer at the Clarence White School of Photography, he bought the best US made 10x8 camera and lens (12" Dagor) then available. I also have a Universal View, no front tilt though or extension rail 27" bellows.

    During WWII the cameras were made by a different workshop features and fittings changed and they were more utilitarian, definitely not the same build quality.

    Ian
     
  9. KenS

    KenS Active Member Registered User

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    I was (fortunately) 'first on the list' of a photographer who had decided that his new 'digital' device could replace that which had been 'doing' with his old Burke and James 8x10, somewhat 'spotty' with the occasional 'lightly scratched' grey paint was soon removed with a 'gentle' paint remover, then lightly sanded and given a coat of clear 'Tung-oil' to its current condition. My 240mm Sironar has since become a dual format lens and works 'nicely' as a wide angle on the B&J... but with greater restrictions for vertical or horizontal 'shifts'
    Much as I might have preferred to be able to afford the 8x10" version of the Sinar P2 that had used before my retirement,
    My 'free' B&J will meet my current needs until a winning lottery ticket 'pays-off' [ :cool: ]

    Ken
     
    Last edited: Jan 28, 2018
  10. Tim Parkin

    Tim Parkin New Member Registered User

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    Yep - I use a Toyo 810MII and as people have already said - it's more than just twice the size and weight, it's a challenge but rewarding. Most people won't see it in the end results but you'll know what you did :)
     
  11. Alan Clark

    Alan Clark Member Registered User

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    Ian, yes I remember your 10x8 camera, when we met up at Goathland. It was the first 10x8 camera I had seen, and it looked HUGE. Far bigger than a 5x4.

    Alan
     
  12. Graham Patterson

    Graham Patterson Member Registered User

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    I used to think 5x4 was big. Then I got my first 10x8 holder!
     
  13. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Active Member Registered User

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    It's the prices 5x4 and 10x8 holders go for now that's ridiculous. I was very lucky to find 6 Fidelity and 2 wooden 10x8 holders and later went back and had 6 5x4 Fidelity holders off the same stall holder at a camera fair I paid about £70 for the lot. They were in good condition and that's about the going rate for one 10x8 holder.

    As for 7x5 near impossible to find in the UK :D

    Ian
     
  14. David M

    David M Active Member Registered User

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    Intrepid have a newly-designed and more affordable 10x8 holder. I've ordered one out of curiosity, but they seem to have boundless optimism when setting delivery dates.
    I've always been baffled by the apparent difficulty and expense of making a box with two lids.
     
  15. Stephen Batey

    Stephen Batey Well-Known Member Registered User

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    I expect that that parts easy; making it light tight and ensuring that the unlidded surfaces are precisely positioned may be trickier.

    On the Intrepid front - my backer number is in the low 80s, and Max told me over the phone that I should expect it to be ready mid January. The problem seems to be that I wanted other things than just a basic camera (5x4 back and film holders) and producing all at the same time is the problem...
     
  16. Alan Clark

    Alan Clark Member Registered User

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    David, that "box with two lids" is more difficult to make than the camera. I have built quite a few large format cameras over the years, but I'm still scratching my head over the problem of making an efficient film holder.

    Alan
     
  17. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Active Member Registered User

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    Adding to what Alan's just said I've had various 5x4 DDS over the years and some makes just don't last, I'm sure it's the same with 7x5 and particularly 10x8 holders as well.

    My 78 year old Agfa Ansco holders are still in great working order :D

    Ian
     
  18. David M

    David M Active Member Registered User

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    Now that's a good point. I too have built cameras and I too have drawn the line at making darkslides. But I was making one-offs and doing everything by hand, more or less on the kitchen table and I would have needed more equipment to rout the grooves for the film and sheath. So, like everyone else, I suspect, I kept a keen eye on eBay instead.
    A dark slide is made from injection mouldings. Once the dies are made it should be simple to assemble the pieces accurately. Our modern world is full of cheap precision engineering. Consider Lego: every block ever made will fit every other and the force needed is always the same, just strong enough to hold but just weak enough for a child's fingers. I can buy a modest printer for less than the price of a single 10x8 DDS.
    I'm certainly not claiming that I could do better, merely that the price surprises me. I assume it's because of the rather limited market, rather than greedy profiteering. Perhaps I shouldn't be so surprised, after all. With reasonable care, they will last a lifetime.

    On another forum, there seem to be intermittent discussions about the accuracy of the positioning of the film plane, but they are tediously pedantic (eg: ...are you focusing on the front or back of the emulsion layer?). They do seem to find surprising variations.
    It seems to me that the worst fault may be lack of flatness.
     
  19. KenS

    KenS Active Member Registered User

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    You don't need to think about it much longer I have printed more than just a few of my 'scanned'4x5 negative onto "Pictorico" a plastic 8.5 x 11 inches sheet ('frosted' on the one side) that will 'take the ink from my CHEAP (or should I call it somewhat inexpensive at $75.00 Canadian ). All you have to do is choose the best ink "colour", when printing out the negative under your
    "build your own UV light 'box' " or can rely on 'sunshine' (If anyone would like a copy of the plans?....[instructions included :cool:], but I would advise that you have an electrician 'finish' the wiring for you. My home-made printing frame will take up to 16x20 inches, should I decide to invest in a 'roll' of Pictorico.


    Ken
     
  20. David M

    David M Active Member Registered User

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    Now that's a good point. I too have built cameras and I too have drawn the line at making darkslides. But I'm making one-offs and doing everything by hand whereas a dark slide is made from injection mouldings. Once the dies are made it should be simple to assemble the pieces accurately. Our modern world is full of cheap precision engineering. It's very strange that I can buy a printer for less than the price of a single 10x8 DDS.

    Apologies. I seem to have double-posted part of a previous posting. I don't know why.
     

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