Anyone Used A Pictorial Lens

Ian-Barber

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I am still striving for a certain look when using 5x4 film and paper negatives. The best way I describe the look is "low contrast" something like this.



I stumbled across an article on "Pictorial Lens" and was wondering if this type of lens would give me this look.
 

Ian Grant

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Try finding an old uncoated Dialyte lens like a Rodenstock Eurynar, Kodak Anastigmat 203mm f7.7, there's plenty of others as they were very common before WWII. With four air spaced elements they are low contrast and easily found in shutters.

Uncoated lens I posted some tests here. Dialytes tend to be sharp lenses but used wide open might be just what you're after.

Ian
 

Ian Grant

Active Member
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Yes but ideally one in a Compur or Ibsor (pre Prontor) shutter, and maybe 150-180mm focal length. You're looking for a low contrast lens that's not too sharp.

I'll look what I've got in my lens boxes, there's a Schneider Dialyte that came with a Gandolfi Half plate camera, the shutter blades are missing - but I might have a spare - however I don't know if the lens cells will clean up sufficiently, it's 18cm I think. I could probably loan you something.

Ian
 

David M

Well-Known Member
Registered User
I'm sure that Ian's advice is the best, but may I also suggest extra exposure and minus development for negs?
When using paper negatives, would it help to use textured paper? Or, if you make paper-to paper contacts, to put a clear film between the two sheets? A sudden thought: even a mildly diffusing sheet? Paper-to-emulsion instead of emulsion-to-emulsion?
A pinhole might give you something similar but with paper negs you would be into Niépceian exposure times, which might be interesting.
I have heard of using a simple magnifying glass, taped to a home-made lensboard.
The American LF forum seems to have members who enjoy using "rubbish" (ahem) lenses and are very knowledgeable about them.
 
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