5x4 Contact Printing

Discussion in 'Talk About Anything Photography Related' started by Ian-Barber, Sep 21, 2016.

  1. Dave_P

    Dave_P New Member

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    I've found 5x4" contact prints (on 5x7" paper) are fun to do once in a while but obviously limited display potential, nice as individual objects though. If you have a particular project then you could make a nice mounted display of several themed contact prints in the same frame though.
     
  2. Mathieu Bauwens

    Mathieu Bauwens Active Member

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    I just love to contact print my 5x4 negatives. all my Laos's images are exhibit only in contact print. It adds some smoothness that doesn't exist in enlarged prints IMO.

    If you do contact sheet of your sheet films, you can have yet a god idea of how it works when contact printing, it's defitively easy, let's have a try.
     
  3. KenS

    KenS Active Member

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    The vast majority of my prints over the past number of years (since my retirement) have been 'contact' prints.. but then it is because I have mostly been printing in the 'archaic' non-silver processes. I am not adverse to digitally 'enlarging' 4x5 negatives onto 8.5 x 11 inch Pictorico to use as a negative under my UV home-made fluorescent light-box. But... as I 'age', I find I am less appreciative of anything printed an 'image area' larger than 11x14 when printed on 'commercial' paper... partly because I don't have the wall space or 'room for the correct viewing distance'. I believe there is something 'sweet' about an 8x10 inch Pictorico negative area printed (with an inch or so of the 'emulsion' showing around the image area for a 16x20 inch frame. I guess I'm following the beliefs of my mentor those many years ago... "Bigger is NOT always better". He enjoyed seeing those viewers getting what he termed 'up close and personal' with his prints.

    Ken
     

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